African American Books
The Online Guide To
African American Books

| HOME | BOOKS | MUSIC | DVD | MAGAZINES | TOYS | LINKS | SEARCH | CONTACT |
| PERSONAL CARE | SOFTWARE | PC HARDWARE | VIDEO GAMES | ELECTRONICS | NEWS |

Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture)

  

by: Heather Andrea Williams

 : Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture)

List Price: $29.95
Amazon.com's Price: $28.27
You Save: $1.68 ( 6%)
as of 10/21/2018 01:32 EDT

Used Price: $9.04
Third Party New Price: $15.65


Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours



This item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping.
Binding: Paperback
Brand: Brand: The University of North Carolina Press
EAN: 9780807858219
Feature: Used Book in Good Condition
ISBN: 0807858218
Item Dimensions: 9206109580
Label: The University of North Carolina Press
Languages: EnglishPublishedEnglishOriginal LanguageEnglishUnknown
Manufacturer: The University of North Carolina Press
MPN: 7 illustrations, 1 table, notes, bibliog
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 320
Publication Date: February 26, 2007
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Release Date: February 26, 2007
Studio: The University of North Carolina Press

Features:


Related Items: Alternate Versions: Click to Display

Browse for similar items by category: Click to Display



Editorial Review:

Product Description:
In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended.

Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.







Customer Reviews
Average Rating: none






 

All products offered for sale in association with Amazon.com Books.



We welcome your comments and suggestions. Send them to webmaster@aabooks.com

Top of Page

Copyright © 2004-2012 African American Books